United States Carbon: Atomspheric Carbon Increases

Preliminary data for February 2013 show CO2 levels last month standing at their highest ever recorded at Manua Loa, a remote volcano in the Pacific. Last month they reached a record 396.80ppm with a jump of 3.26ppm between February 2012 and 2013.  Carbon dioxide levels fluctuate seasonally, with the highest levels usually observed in April. Last year the highest level at Mauna Loa was measured at 396.18ppm.

What is disturbing scientists is the acceleration of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere, which are occurring in spite of attempts by governments to restrain fossil fuel emissions.  According to the observatory, the average annual rate of increase for the past 10 years has been 2.07ppm – more than double the increase in the 1960s. The average increase in CO2 levels between 1959 to the present was 1.49ppm per year.

“The challenge we already knew was great is even more difficult”, said Kelly Levin, a researcher with the World Resources Institute in Washington. “But even with an increased level of reductions necessary, it shows that a 2°C goal is still attainable –if we act ambitiously and immediately.”

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com

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4 thoughts on “United States Carbon: Atomspheric Carbon Increases

  1. Pingback: United States Carbon: Environmentally Conscious Companies Have More Productive Employees | United States Carbon

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  3. Pingback: Why the name United States Carbon? | United States Carbon

  4. Pingback: Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from developing countries will be 127 percent higher than in the world’s most developed economies by 2040 | United States Carbon

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