Category Archives: Project Management

United States Carbon: Smart Power Opens Minds, Opens Markets

“Why give money to people that don’t like us?”

“We’re broke at home, so how can we afford to send money to people abroad?”

These are the two most oft-repeated objections heard by many US senators and congressmen to spending money on international affairs programs. So why would the US Chamber of Commerce and the US Global Leadership Coalition (USGLC), a coalition of over four hundred businesses and non-governmental organizations along with over one hundred thirty retired generals and admirals, call on Congress this week to do exactly that?

It’s just smart business.

A senior sales executive at a major US company recently told me, “We’re the best in the world at designing the next generation of products in [our industry]. But we’re terrible at figuring out the next generation market for those products.” For many American companies, from aviation to pharmaceuticals, the lead-time for product development can take decades. According to this executive, “As a company, we need to be in these developing markets now…investing through our corporate responsibility and citizenship programs,” she said. “That’s why we need partnerships with NGOs [non-governmental organizations] and folks like USAID…they’ve got intimate knowledge, on the ground in developing nations and can help us build trust in those countries now so we don’t show up late to the party after the Chinese beat us to the punch.”

Programs funded by the International Affairs Budget create enabling environments for American businesses to succeed in overseas markets today.   

Unlike many of our counterparts in Europe and Asia, American businesses don’t always think about export markets.

That has to change. “Outside our borders are markets that represent 80 percent of the world’s purchasing power, 92 percent of its economic growth, and 95 percent of its consumers,” testified John Murphy, Vice President of International Affairs for the US Chamber of Commerce, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Wednesday.

As these data indicate, the American economy simply can’t afford to ignore export markets any more. In fact, according to Murphy, many American businesses already grasp this reality and take advantage of it, “One in three manufacturing jobs depends on exports, and one in three acres on American farms is planted for hungry consumers overseas. Nearly 300,000 small and medium-sized businesses export, accounting for more than one-third of all merchandise exports.”

The most forward-looking companies increasingly use their own “smart power” partnerships with international development agencies and NGOs as a way of opening markets. While a country uses smart power when it intelligently combines hard military power with soft – diplomatic, development, economic – power, companies combine their hard power – revenues, contracts, supply chains – with their soft power – brand, corporate citizenship, public-private partnership, philanthropy. A senior corporate responsibility officer at a major US corporation recently described the use of, “CSR and philanthropy in the ‘pre-competitive’ stage,” as a way of investing in new markets before his products and those of his competitors have reached developing countries in order to build both trust and purchasing capacity. These smart power partnerships are another way the international affairs budget pays dividends for American companies.

In his testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Bill Lane, head of Caterpillar‘s Washington Office and Co-President of the USGLC, pointed out that many developing countries have limited ability buy American products and services today. “In these countries the road to development – and the investment, commerce, and trade that follow –may begin (literally) with a road,” testified Lane, “referring to the basic infrastructure that must be improved and, in some cases, created from scratch using machinery and expertise often supplied by companies like Caterpillar.”

Lane said businesses need, “conditions where there are stable governments, transparency, predictability, adequate financial infrastructure, free market economic policies that allow for competition, and rule of law.” Lane voiced the collective conviction of USGLC’s four hundred business and NGO members that, “…programs funded in the International Affairs Budget are vitally important for America’s economic future, national security, and global influence.”

Both Lane and Murphy urged America not “unilaterally disarm,” in the face of growing competition from Chinese and other potential competitors. In their view, the smart power combinations of American businesses, NGOs, and government agencies can level the playing field abroad and expand the economy at home. For firms like Caterpillar, the math is simple, according to Lane, “The more trucks and tractors we sell overseas, the more jobs… in places like Peoria where those vehicles are manufactured.”

Modest investments – the international affairs budget represents just over one percent of the federal budget – can pay big rewards for shareholders, America, and the world. After all, as Bill Gates has said, “Investing in the world’s poorest people is the smartest way our government spends money.”

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology that will help you become greener, cleaner, and more socially responsible please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com

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United States Carbon: Buildings Account for 39% of CO 2 emissions in the United States

The commercial and residential building sector accounts for 39% of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States per year, more than any other sector. U.S. buildings alone are responsible for more CO 2 emissions annually than those of any other country except China. Most of these emissions come from the combustion of fossil fuels to provide heating, cooling and lighting, and to power appliances and electrical equipment. By transforming the built environment to be more energy-efficient and climate-friendly, the building sector can play a major role in reducing the threat of climate change.

A growing source of CO2 emissions:
  • In 2004, total emissions from residential and commercial buildings were 2236 million metric tons of CO 2 , or 39% of total U.S. CO 2 emissions—more than either the transportation or industrial sector
  • Over the next 25 years, CO 2 emissions from buildings are projected to grow faster than any other sector, with emissions from commercial buildings projected to grow the fastest—1.8% a year through 2030
  • When other CO 2 emissions attributable to buildings are considered—such as the emissions from the manufacture and transport of building construction and demolition materials and transportation associated wi th urban sprawl—the result is an even greater impact on the climate

Buildings consume 70% of the electricity load in the U.S. The most significant factor contributing to CO 2 emissions from buildings is their use of electricity:

  • Commercial and residential buildings are tremendous users of electricity, accounting for more than 70% of electricity use in the U.S.
  • The building sector consumed 40 quadrillion Bt us of energy in 2005 at a cost of over $300 billion. Energy use in the sector is projected to increase to 50 quadrillion Btus at a cost of $430 billion by the year 2025.
  • The energy impact of buildings is likely to be even greater when taking into account other energy use attributable to buildin gs. For example, the energy embodied in a single building’s envelope equals 8-10 times t he annual energy used to heat and cool the building.
  • Buildings have a lifespan of 50-100 years during which they continually consume energy and produce CO 2 emissions. If half of new commercial buildings were built to use 50% less energy, it would save over 6 million metric tons of CO 2 annually for the life of the buildings—the equivalent of taking more than 1 million cars off the road every year.

Green buildings are a vital tool in the fight against climate change

Scientists predict that left unchecked, emissions of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases from human activities will raise global temperatures by 2.5ºF to 10ºF this century. The effects will be profound, and may include rising sea levels, more frequent floods and droughts, and increased spread of infectious diseases. To address the threat of climate change, greenhouse gas emissions must be sl owed, stopped, and reversed. Meeting the challenge will require dramatic advances in technologies and a shift in how the world economy generates and uses energy.

Building green is one of the best strategies for meeting the challenge of climate change because the technology to make substantial reductions in energy and CO 2 emissions already exists. The average LEED certified building uses 32% less electricity and saves 350 metric tons of CO 2 emissions annually. Modest investments in energy-saving and other climate-friendly technologies can yield buildings and communities that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthier places to live and work, and that contribute to reducing CO 2 emissions.

Green buildings provide abundant opportunities for saving energy and mitigating CO 2 emissions

Building green can reduce CO2 emissions while improving the bottom line through energy and other savings. Examples of measures that can be taken to improve building performance include:

  • Incorporating the most efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, along with operations and maintenance of such systems to assure optimum performance
  • Using state of the art lighting and optimizing daylighting
  • Using recycled content building and interior materials
  • Reducing potable water usage
  • Using renewable energy
  • Implementing proper construction waste management
  • Siting the building near public transportation
  • Using locally produced building materials

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology that will help you become greener, cleaner, and more socially responsible please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com

United States Carbon: HP Travels ‘Modern Silk Road’ To Cut Freight Footprint

When it comes to reducing emissions related to freight, trains rate better than either trucks or airplanes. With this in mind, high-tech manufacturer Hewlett-Packard negotiated a new rail route to haul notebook computers and displays made at its factories deep in Chongqing, China, out to distributors and customers as far away as Germany.

The line mirrors the fabled Silk Road, the ancient web of paths and routes used to transport spices, gems and silk fabric by camel from their Chinese sources to markets in Europe.

The modern-day edition trailblazed by HP spans 6,700 miles, covers two continents and crosses six countries. It takes about three weeks for HP’s express trains to complete a one-way journey, traveling at speeds of up to 50 miles per hour and safeguarded by armed security guards.

“Despite the distance, the journey is cost-effective and better for the environment than air transport, and it’s faster than ocean shipping,” says HP, in a blog post describing the project.

The new rail route was several years in the making. In 2010, HP developed manufacturing facilities in inland and western China in 2010 to take advantage of government economic incentives. But there was no easy way to get the products out of the region, so the company’s supply chain team negotiated government agencies and rail import/export systems operators in China, Kazakhstan, Russia, Belarus, Poland and Germany to make the route a reality.

Now, HP dispatches express trains at least once weekly in the summer. The company plans to continue using the route for the time this coming winter, but it had to develop special packaging to protect the devices being transported: temperatures along the way can plummet to below -4 Fahrenheit, which is way too cold for most electronics to handle.

According to Tony Prophet, senior vice president of operations for HP Printing and Personal Systems, the rail route offers his company three distinct competitive advantages:

Environmental benefits – This mode of transportation carries one-thirtieth of the carbon footprint associated with air freight.

Cost and time savingsTransporting products from remote locations in inland China out to the coast where they can be shipped by air can takes up to 35 days, and it is far more expensive. The rail alternative costs about one-third the price of air transport, estimates HP.

The promise of better working conditions – By keeping its manufacturing plants in Western China, the company is contributing to economic growth in the region and can draw from a larger pool of potential factory workers.

Eventually, the route will be used for other sorts of shipments – and by other manufacturers.

Chinese authorities plan 50 trains next year, carrying $1 billion worth of goods, reports The New York Times. The first non-HP train headed north in July, with $1.5 million of tires, shoes and clothes on board. It will return with German electronics, vehicles and auto parts, and medical supplies.

HP was the No. 2 company on the latest Greenpeace Greener Electronics ranking and the Newsweek Green US ranking. It also consistently ranks as a leader for corporate responsibility reporting.

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology that will help you become greener, cleaner, and more socially responsible please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com

Why the name United States Carbon?

Why the name United States Carbon? The world has a carbon emissions problem that is threatening (within 40 – 100 years) all biological life on the planet. United States Carbon’s mission is to help businesses of all kinds mitigate their carbon impact on the biosphere by becoming far more energy efficient.

Large rise in CO2 emissions sounds climate change alarm

Hopes for ‘safe’ temperature increase within 2°C fade as Hawaii station documents second-greatest emissions increase.

 

Hawaii’s Mauna Loa observatory, where record CO2 increases are being documented.

The chances of the world holding temperature rises to 2°C – the level of global warming considered “safe” by scientists – appear to be fading fast with US scientists reporting the second-greatest annual rise in CO2 emissions in 2012.

Carbon dioxide levels measured at Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii jumped by 2.67 parts per million (ppm) in 2012 to 395ppm, said Pieter Tans, who leads the greenhouse gas measurement team for the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The record was an increase of 2.93ppm in 1998.

The jump comes as a study published in Science on Thursday looking at global surface temperatures for the past 1,500 years warned that “recent warming is unprecedented“, prompting UN climate chief, Christiana Figueres, to say that “staggering global temps show urgent need to act. Rapid climate change must be countered with accelerated action.

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology that will help you become greener, cleaner, and more socially responsible please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com

United States Carbon: Triple Bottom Line

Most conscious businesses subscribe to a Triple Bottom Line model of success. They aim to provide positive value in the domains of people, planet, and profit.

Profit

It is possible for a business to cut costs, tread more lightly on the earth and improve its bottom line – all at the same time.  The United States Carbon value proposition and mission shows companies how to do all three at once.  It also shows them how to enhance their image (for greater consumer affinity) and how to accrue an asset on the balance sheet (a carbon credit).

People

A conscious business seeks to benefit the livelihood of all its key constituents, including manufacturers, affected communities, and humanity at large. Some trends in conscious business which have arisen out of these efforts include:

  • The forming of wellness affirming workplace cultures
  • Improved employee benefit programs
  • Use of fair trade materials for manufacture or sale
  • Assistance to communities who supply raw materials
  • Assistance to communities who manufacture materials
  • Local community outreach programs
  • Reduction of energy use and toxins in products and operations.
Planet

A conscious corporation will seek to minimize its impact on the environment, and replenish the environment where it is able. Conscious corporations may choose to benefit the environment in many different ways, some trends include:

  • Robust recycling programs
  • Building or operating “green” or “net-zero carbon impact” workplace facilities …Some companies like Google achieve this by incorporating energy savings programs and purchasing carbon credits annually.
  • Using solar or wind energy in the workplace
  • Reducing energy use or going carbon neutral as a business.
  • Purchasing materials from organic or sustainable farmers
  • Purchasing renewable and sustainable materials
  • Working with environmentally conscious distributors
  • Urging manufacturers and distributors to adopt better environmental practices
  • Adopting sustainable product packaging
  • Designing their products & services with natural principles and fidelity in mind

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com

A United States Carbon Sustainability Plan is self-funding. Benefiting People, Planet, And Profits…at the same time.

United States Carbon LLC, is an energy efficiency and Business Sustainability Project Management Company. Our business clients will become more Energy Efficient, Greener, Cleaner, More Socially Responsible and more profitable – all at the same time, and for little or no capital outlay. The energy savings from United States Carbon proposed projects are what is used to fund all project costs.  Simply put, we help companies reduce their energy consumption, increase the value of their  business and improve their company’s social responsibility through our Carbon Reduction Audit, Technologies & Project Funding Process.  United States Carbon combines the best in class technology utilizing, SMART WEB, SAETEC and SHOMEL to achieve the most comprehensive approach to reduction of energy in exchange for Carbon Assets. Our software solutions measure energy consumption and create the baseline for the Carbon Assets. Our solution can be offered as software service (SaaS) to large greenhouse gas emitters for corporate social responsibility, reporting and compliance management.

A United States Carbon Sustainability Plan is self-funding.  Benefiting People, Planet, And Profits…at the same time. 

To learn more about United States Carbon and our energy reduction technology please contact us at (855) 393-7555 or visit our website: www.unitedstatescarbon.com